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Poster Inspiration: Simple LInes

Poster Inspiration: Simple LInes

With a long holiday and weekend ahead I decided to work on a few ideas for my personal site and some posters. To get started I looked for some references in different styles, the first one is a minimal, Swiss style with diagonal lines or simple lines. Below you can see some of my favorite posters and artworks that are on my moodboards.

Swiss Typography Style Posters

Swiss Typography Style Posters

These posters were designed by graphic designer Mike Joyce inspired by his love of punk rock and swiss modernism. Mike redesigned many rock show flyers into international style posters. Each design is set in lowercase berthold akzidenz-grotesk medium (not helvetica). Every single one of these shows actually happened. To view the entire poster collection visit Swissted.com. The International Typographic Style, also known as the Swiss Style, is a graphic design style developed in Switzerland in the 1950s that emphasizes cleanliness, readability and objectivity. Hallmarks of the style are asymmetric layouts, use of a grid, sans-serif typefaces like Akzidenz Grotesk, and flush left, ragged right text. The style is also associated with a preference for photography in place of illustrations or drawings. Many of the early International Typographic Style works featured typography as a primary design element in addition to its use in text, and it is for this that the style is named. To view the entire poster collection visit Swissted.com.

Swiss Style Graphic Design

I'm a true admirer of most graphic design styles. There are tons of inspiration all over the web, but most certainly, one of the greatest is the sweet Swiss Style. It began in the 1920's and was a true milestone in graphic design. During the 1920s and ’30s, skills traditionally associated with Swiss industry, particularly pharmaceuticals and mechanical engineering, were matched by those of the country’s graphic designers, who produced their advertising and technical literature. These pioneering graphic artists saw design as part of industrial production and searched for anonymous, objective visual communication. They chose photographic images rather than illustration, and typefaces that were industrial-looking rather than those designed for books. - Richard Hollis (Yale University Press) These are the main inspiration for thousands of designers all over the world. These "simple", grided pieces were a true revolution in an industry that was seeking new life. If you didn't know it, I recommend you to research more about it. At the bottom of the post we have some links for your use. We hope you all find it useful and inspiring. Cheers! ;) These links might be useful to you: Lessons From Swiss Style Graphic Design and Swiss Graphic Design.

Remember Sigi von Koeding aka DARE

Last week the graffiti artist Sigi von Koeding died because of cancer. In 1986 the swiss started to spray under the moniker "DARE" and has marked his name - in lots of typographic variations - on walls from Europe to the rest of the world. In 1990 he achieved to be the first swiss sprayer who started freelancing. The brand "Belton Molotow" honored him with a very own spray can called "dare orange". We want to honor him one last time. Rest in peace For more information please visit his website http://www.dare.ch/ Sigi von Koeding 1868-2010